Questions
1 What HKILA is and does?

2 What advancement has the HKILA achieved?

3 How the HKILA can help its members?

4 What professional or academic links, locally and internationally have been set up by the HKILA for its development?

5 How can one become a member of the HKILA?

6 How many categories and classes are there in the HKILA memberships and what are their respective privileges and obligations?

7 Who would have the privilege in using the designation of ˇ§F.I.L.A.ˇ¨ to indicate his position in the Institute? What would be the privileges and obligations of being a F.I.L.A.?

8 Who would have the privilege in using the designation of ˇ§M.I.L.A.ˇ¨ to indicate his position in the Institute? What would be the privileges and obligations of being a M.I.L.A.?

9 How can an Associate Member or Affiliate Member become M.I.L.A.?

10 What training opportunities would be offered by the HKILA for the young land executives?

11 What is land administration?

12 Who can be called/named land administration specialist?

13 What does the land executive/manager do?

14 What are the principal specialized areas of land administration?

15 Is land administration a prospective career?

16 Who can become a land exeuctive/manager?

17 From where one can receive land administration training?

18 What plans have the HKILA scheduled for land administration professionalism?

19 What major research programs have the HKILA undertaken?

20 Can you tell me something about the ethical codes for Professional Land Administrators?

21 I wish to know more about the HKILA, please let me know to whom I can contact for details?

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Answers

  1. What HKILA is and does?

  2. The Hong Kong Institute of Land Administration was founded on 4th April 1995. Through its mission for developing, promoting and maintaining the professional standards of land administration and management in both public and private sectors of Hong Kong, it aims to contribute substantially to the promotion of good land management/planning and, thereby, to the advancement of land use and control upon which the community and Hong Kong depend.

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  3. What advancement has the HKILA achieved?

  4. Since its formation, the Institute has grown consistently and its members constitute a substantial body of professional expertise. This expertise will be ultimately available to the general community and particularly to the students of land administration or young executives being engaged in land management. These students and young executives are the professionals of the future, as it is for them in particular and the practicing professional land managers in general that the Institute has schemed to publish research papers, journal and literature on land administration of both academic and professional interest.

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  5. How the HKILA can help its members?

  6. The Institute has developed and maintained the following services and facilities to its members:

    Hong Kong Land Administration Journal. Members will receive regular issues of the Hong Kong Land Administration Quarterly, which publishes and reports articles on practical and professional interests on all aspects of the land managersˇ¦ job and career.

    Land Management Literature. The Institute would publish books on land management and the related subjects written by its members. For details, please contact Secretary/Editorial Committee.

    Management Software. The Institute has developed and continues to develop land management/general management software for computers. For details, please contact the Secretary of the Science and Research Committee.

    Consultation. The Institute will soon form a panel of consultants providing services in the first instance to members on tackling land administration problems. For details, please contact Secretary of the Science and Research Committee.

    Library Service. All members are entitled to make full use of the library service. For details, please contact the Secretary of the Science and Research Committee.

    Meetings and Conference. The Institute will hold luncheon meetings, seminars and conferences on topical land administration/management and the related interests at regular intervals. This also provides a forum for meeting other professionals in the land administration field.

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  7. What professional or academic links, locally and internationally have been set up by the HKILA for its development?

  8. The Institute has forged close links with the local land authority (e.g. Lands Department and Planning Department) of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government; the land authorities of the provinces, cities, counties and districts of the Mainland and the Peopleˇ¦s Republic of China State Land Administration of the Central Government and all major academic and training organizations. It will also maintain strong links with other professional land administration bodies such as the China Land Society in order to provide a comprehensive list of contacts for exchange of views on land administration matters.

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  9. How can one become a member of the HKILA?

  10. HKILA membership is open to all those engaged in or concerned with land administration/ management or the related specialist functions such as land management education, land acquisition and development, legal service on land/landed property conveyance, village housing and development and those who have undergone the training and gained the relevant experiences recognized by the Institute.

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  11. How many categories and classes are there in the HKILA membership and what are their respective privileges and obligations?

  12. There are four classes of HKILA membership. Ordinary Members and Fellows enjoy voting/election rights; whereas Affiliate Members and Associate Members do not. Ordinary Members and Fellows shall also have the right to identify themselves to their clients and the general public as MILA and FILA respectively. All classes of HKILA Members shall have rights of access to the Institute's services and facilities including professional supports and library service.

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  13. Who would have the privilege in using the designation of ˇ§F.I.L.A.ˇ¨ to indicate his position in the Institute? What would be the privileges and obligations of being a F.I.L.A.?

  14. Fellow of the Institute shall have the right in using the designation of F.I.L.A. to identify his position in the Institute. It is the highest professional status and title of the Institute given to those members who have prominently contributed to found, to build, to strengthen and to expand or to contribute the like that have benefited the land administration profession . According to the Article and Chapter Two of the Bylaws of the Institute, Ordinary Members of 10 or more years of seniority may apply for promotion to Fellows. As a matter of principle, FILA is a senior land administration practitioner whose knowledge, experience and skills in the field have been well tested and shall be reliable and trustworthy.

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  15. Who would have the privilege in using the designation of ˇ§M.I.L.A.ˇ¨ to indicate his position in the Institute? What would be the privileges and obligations of being a M.I.L.A.?

  16. Ordinary Members of the Institute shall have the privilege of using the designation of M.I.L.A. An Ordinary Member is a land administration practitioner whose knowledge and skills are deemed to measure up to the standards required for a qualified land administration professional. Any members having MILA membership shall have voting and election rights; using HKILA's facilities and services; and applying for upgrading to Fellowship subject to compliance with other requirements.

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  17. How can an Associate Member or Affiliate Member become M.I.L.A.?

  18. Any person being engaged in land administration profession or land administration related activities may apply for Associate Membership or Affiliate Membership. An Associate Member having possessed requisite personal qualities, received such training, passed such examination in land administration and practised land administration for a continuous period of over 6 years after obtaining such qualification may apply for upgrading to Ordinary Membership. An Affiliate Member having passed such examination, received such training as recognized by the Institute and having possessed requisite personal qualities may apply for upgrading to Associate Membership or Ordinary Membership subject to approval granted by the Membership Committee.

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  19. What training opportunities would be offered by the HKILA for the young land executives?

  20. The Institute is planning to run courses or research programmes leading to the award of professional certificate/diploma in land administration for the young land executives/managers. Seminars, conferences focusing on subjects related to land administration would also be arranged by the Institute for the land executives/managers with a view to enhancing their knowledge and skills necessary for the successful practice of land administration. The Institute has also engaged actively in negotiations with the Renmin University in Peking, other universities in Guangdong and other provinces in China, overseas, and locally, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University for running first degree or higher degree programmes for members and young managers engaged in land administration work.

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  21. What is land administration?

  22. Land administration is the process by which land is managed and put to good effect as the most basic, vital and valuable resource that supports human activities and livelihood. It covers all activities concerned with the administration or management of land as a resource from economic, social and environmental perspectives. As regards subject matters of land administration, it would include the processes of formulation and implementation of land-use policies; monitoring of development or redevelopment of lands; land/property conveyancing; management of land resources such as agriculture, forestry, soils, mines, rivers and river-bed, foreshore and seabed; compilation and maintenance of land records; land use planning; estate development and management; and monitoring of all activities on land and buildings erected thereon that may affect the best use of land as resource that supports human activities and livelihood.

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  23. Who can be called/named land administration specialist?

  24. The generic title for such specialists is usually land manager, land executive or land administrator. Their functions may be exercised at various levels within an organization, from director ranking personnel in the boardroom, down to a junior executive supervising a team of land inspectors dealing with various aspects of land administration.

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  25. What does a land executive/manager do?

  26. A land executive/manager responsible for acquisition of land for development has to deal with purchase or resumption of private lands; a land executive/manager for lease enforcement has to handle breaches of leases; a land executive/manager for land control has to tackle illegal dumping and unlawful occupation of lands; a land executive/manager for land/property conveyancing has to manage or execute land/property transactions; a land executive/manager for formulating land use policy has to deal with land use planning etc. A land executive working in the Hong Kong SAR Government may have to manage and implement village houses policy (usually known as Small House Policy).

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  27. What are the principal specialized areas of land administration?

  28. Land Acquisition

    The acquisition of land for development or redevelopment, for private or public purposes will be the purviews of land administrators who are sometimes known as project manager/director. Some land administrators employed by land developers for purchasing lands are known as project managers or programme managers.
     

    Land Disposal

    Some land administrators are working for their clients in disposing lands either for short term or long term purposes.
     

    Lease Enforcement

    Land administrators may also be responsible for enforcing conditions of leases or tenancies and for taking those measures that may remedy the breaches.
     

    Land Registration and Cadastres Management

    Cadastral survey, cadastres maintenance and land registration are the duties of land administration. In view of this the land registrars working in the land registries should also be regarded as land administrators.
     

    Land Policy and Administration

    This is a specialist area and a land administrator concerned with it is usually a staff of high-ranking manager with high skills in formulating and creating policy and in actualizing the objectives as defined by that policy.
     

    Land/Property Planning and Development

    This, too is a specialist area and a land administrator concerned with it uses planning and implementation techniques for achieving the goals as set by development plans.
     

    Land Control

    Land administrators responsible for land control is to manage land against illegal occupation, unlawful development, illegal dumping, and misuses of land. Land environmental control, landscape improvement and street management are also falling within the purviews of land administration.
     

    Land Administration Research and Training

    In order to maintain the standards and to advance the knowledge/skills of land administration, some senior land administration professionals are conducting researches for exploring new land management skills and techniques or in conducting training programmes for developing young land managers.

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  29. Is land administration a prospective career?

  30. Increasingly so. Today, entrants to the profession are graduates having studied in colleges or universities on subjects in land administration, management studies, property management, laws, land law and property law, Chinese laws, Chinese land law and property law, geography, geology, land economics, sociology, Chinese beliefs, traditions & customs, urban and rural planning, land and estate surveying, estate management, housing management, personnel administration, organizational behavior, organization and management, human resource management, strategy management, project management and other related subjects. The increase of better-educated young managers in land administration has enhanced the qualities of service rendered to the society. With society endorsement, more and more career opportunities have been created for the elite land managers. In view of this, land administration today offers a career path to both men and women, with prospects of rising to very senior positions either in organizations or in society.

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  31. Who can become a land exeuctive/manager?

  32. Entrants to land administration are usually known as land executives who can climb up the organizational ladder to director level as they become more experienced. In the past, opportunities were given to matriculants who entered the profession of land administration without formal professional training but had earned their specialist status through years of working experience in the field. By the seventies till mid eighties, entrants (some were matriculants, some were graduates of post-secondary colleges or universities) to the profession had to undergo years of training by attending formal training courses of part-time day release programme taught by the then Hong Kong Polytechnic (now known as the Hong Kong Polytechnic University). Today, entrants to the profession are mostly university graduates in relevant disciplines.

    The development of land administration training has been the cardinal principle of the Hong Kong Institute of Land Administration's policy since its formation in 1995. A network of land administration training facilities would be built up in conjunction with colleges and universities locally, in mainland or overseas. Apart from this, the Institute has also striven to organize seminars or research programmes leading to the award of certificate or diploma recognized by the Institute for admission of membership.

    Though the MILA title awarded by the HKILA is not a prerequisite to practicing land administration, having regard to the trend towards higher standards of professionalism, the Institute intends to bring land administration on to a truly professional footing.

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  33. From where one can receive land administration training?

  34. The Institute, the Renmin University in Peking and some other China's universities are running land administration courses leading from certificate to master degree levels. The Institute has also started discussing with the administration of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University for resuming the two-year professional certificate program for junior land executives and degree courses for advanced land managers.

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  35. What plans have the HKILA scheduled for land administration professionalism?

  36. The Professional Development Committee of the Institute has commenced to draft a development scheme for land administration professionalism. When it is available, it would be disclosed here.

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  37. What major research programs have the HKILA undertaken?

  38. The Science and Research Faculty of the Institute is to develop some major research programmes for the years to come. When they are available, details would be disclosed here.

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  39. Can you tell me something about the ethical codes for Professional Land Administrators?

  40. The Institute is yet to finalize the ethical codes for Professional Land Administrators, the following statements are the proposed codes (subject to amendments):

    A LAND ADMINISTRATOR SHALL always maintain in highest standards of professional conduct.

    A LAND ADMINISTRATOR SHALL , in all forms of land administrative or managerial practice, be dedicated to providing competent service in full professional and moral independence, in the belief that land is the most basic, vital and valuable resource that supports human activities and livelihood.

    A LAND ADMINISTRATOR SHALL deal honestly with clients and colleagues, and strive to expose those land administrators deficient in character or competence, or who engage in fraud or deception.

    A LAND ADMINISTRATOR SHALL respect the rights of clients, of colleagues, and of other land professionals, and shall safeguard client's confidences.

    A LAND ADMINISTRATOR SHALL NOT permit motives of profit to influence the free and independent exercise of professional judgement on behalf of clients.

    A LAND ADMINISTRATOR SHALL NOT permit considerations of social standing, wealth, party politics, religion, race or nationality to intervene between his duty and his clients.

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  41. I wish to know more about the HKILA, please let me know to whom I can contact for details?
The Institute has set up a number of functional committees for developing and maintaining special functions. Should you wish to know something more of these special functions, you may contact the respective officers as follows:
Functions
Offices
Office Bearers
(Tel.)
General Secretary/Council Chung Ka Wah, Lawrence  
Public Relations Chairman/Public Relations Lee Sze Mun, Almond 9220 5050
Membership Chairman/Membership Ho Siu Hung
9830 6611
Journal Chief Editor Yuen Siu Kee, Timothy
 
Research Dean/Science & Research (vacant)
 
Professional Development Chairman/Professional Development Fung Shing Sang, Philip
 

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